Color Woodcut Printmaking Workshop 2019

This intensive, exciting workshop will awaken the possibilities for the woodcut printing process for the beginning and advanced printmaker.   This approach is not technically tradition-bound…but inventive, with contemporary, creative methods, that can be spontaneous, simple and direct.   This expressive medium will be introduced and explored through demonstrations and discussions of cutting techniques, oil-base inks and water-base inks, modifiers, and printing by hand as well as using the press.   Participants will go from designing their images and cutting blocks, to printing several projects using a variety of methods and individual discoveries.  For all levels.

KarenTeaching

Studio Sale!

Find intriguing treasures – prints, artists books, boxes! Large to small selections of woodcuts, etchings, monoprints, mezzotints, handmade papers, framed, unframed.

Discounts!

In time for holiday gifting!

 

 


Letterpress for Card-making!

Thursday, December 13, 6:00pm – 9:00pm

$35

limited spaces – one session!

Play with the woodtype and printers cuts to make holiday cards and sentiments. Learn the basics of typesetting and lock-up and how to use the Vandercook and the new (old) Challenge presses for type-high explorations.


STELLAR Small Prints 2 – Invitational Exhibition

December 1, 2018 – January 26, 2019

First Friday December 7, 6-8pm

 

John Amoss, Georgia

Susan Belau, California
Marnix Everaert, Belgium

Andrew Kozlowski, Florida

Jillian Sokso, Oregon

Art Werger, Ohio

 

 

This exhibition presents the work of outstanding printmakers that use small printed forms for intimate visual engagement and graphic invention. The quality of their vision is expressed through an attentive nature and handwork. Additional small prints from the Constellation Studios collection will be on view.


STELLAR Small Prints 2 – Invitational Exhibition

December 1, 2018 – January 26, 2019

First Friday December 7, 6-8pm

• John Amoss

• Susan Belau
• Marnix Everaert

• Andrew Kozlowski

• Jillian Sokso

• Art Werger

StellarSmallPrints2_newversion

This exhibition presents the work of outstanding printmakers that use small printed forms for intimate visual engagement and graphic invention. The quality of their vision is expressed through an attentive nature and handwork. Additional small prints from the Constellation Studios collection will be on view.


Artists in Residence Kazuko and Kaoru

Two artists from Tokyo Japan have been in residence here during November.   Kazuko Araki and Kaoru Morita are sharing a great experience for concentration on their printmaking and enjoying cultural exchange.   This is their first visit to the USA, and they are seeing Nebraska go through  all the drama of fall to winter changes, while enjoying the open prairie landscape, football crowds, and studio activities of exhibitions and workshops.   We are enjoying our language efforts and translations about life and printmaking!   Special thanks to the Center for the Science of Human Endeavor in Tokyo for continuing to facilitating this exchange opportunity for Japanese artists!

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Kaoru is working in Mokuhanga (Japanese watercolor woodblock) with soft colors printed by hand, one each day for a color record of atmosphere and influences.  She specializes in shallow carving into the woodblock, so that beautiful nuances of tone are printed.   Her drawing is here of a still life from some of the handblown glass pieces of Kenny Walton, and her woodblock print from this image is just getting underway.

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Kazuko has created two editions of collagraph prints, from multiple cardboard plates, that have textures and drypoint scratches that hold the ink, printed in registration for a constructivist landscape for mountain goats.   She is inventive with her platemaking and the beautiful printed layers.   These two artist friends have studied printmaking together at the Musashino Art School in Tokyo.

 

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Etching & Drypoint Workshop

Saturday & Sunday, November 3 -4, 10:00am – 4:00pm

For all levels

$150 + materials

Learn this traditional intaglio technique where drawing marks and textures are etched below the surface, and the drypoint technique is directly scratched to build burrs on the surface. These techniques create beautiful details and line qualities.


The Print: Tried & True, Techno & New

Rough Cut

September 29 – November 21, 2018

First Friday Opening Reception:   October 5, 6-8pm

 

Featuring:

Stacy Asher, Lincoln, NE

Randy Garber, Boston, MA

Shelley Gipson, Jonesboro, AK

Nicole Pietrantoni, Walla Walla, WA

Miguel Riviera, Kansas City, MO

Barbara Robertson, Seattle, WA

Erik Waterkotte, Charlotte, NC

Listening,Receive 1KuncCaritas

Seven contemporary artists present works in print media and new technological approaches that examine the continuing necessity for the print in contemporary culture, with an aesthetic need for the printed mark with intent, and how impact is made.   Printmakers have continuously been the adapters of new technologies since the 15th Century, and are at the forefront of “inter-print” adaptations today, with the use of digital technologies for printing, for carving and platemaking, for photo-mechanical integrations, as well as photo imagery inclusions.   Significantly, prints today respond to the look of our technological age, that grants aesthetic weight to data gathering, chart and graph lines, the visual overload and dynamism of designed ad/image production, glowing screen colors and light as the impression. These artists question how to see and examine the world around us, through visual cues and memory.

 

This exhibition coincides with the Mid America College Art Association Conference hosted by the UNL School of Art, Art History & Design, October 4-6, 2018.     The conference theme is “Techne Expanding: New Tensions, Tools, Terrain”.


The Print: Tried & True, Techno & New

September 29 – November 21, 2018

First Friday Opening Reception:   October 5, 6-8pm

Rough Cut

Barbara Robertson (above)

Featuring:

Stacy Asher, Lincoln, NE

Randy Garber, Boston, MA

Shelley Gipson, Jonesboro, AK

Nicole Pietrantoni, Walla Walla, WA

Miguel Riviera, Kansas City, MO

Barbara Robertson, Seattle, WA

Erik Waterkotte, Charlotte, NC

Seven contemporary artists present works in print media and new technological approaches that examine the continuing necessity for the print in contemporary culture, with an aesthetic need for the printed mark with intent, and how impact is made.   Printmakers have continuously been the adapters of new technologies since the 15th Century, and are at the forefront of “inter-print” adaptations today, with the use of digital technologies for printing, for carving and platemaking, for photo-mechanical integrations, as well as photo imagery inclusions.   Significantly, prints today respond to the look of our technological age, that grants aesthetic weight to data gathering, chart and graph lines, the visual overload and dynamism of designed ad/image production, glowing screen colors and light as the impression. These artists question how to see and examine the world around us, through visual cues and memory.

Asher places graphic charged words to provoke our reading eye and mindfulness as a means to shape culture. Garber seeks to express the confusion and clarity of information, with structures that suggest the cochlea, the eardrum, and instruments of sound.   Pietrantoni combines laser burning and corrosion onto paper to speak of nature’s cycles of decay, destruction and loss. Gipson creates sensual surfaces across digital prints as bodies fall or leap, with despair and hope giving us anxious encounters with human nature.   Riviera references the sense of truth and respect in map imagery, as digital deletion with laser engraving enacts the exchange of viruses and natural resources that are relevant to the history of colonization. Robertson questions how imagination, geometry and structure relate to our physical and cultural environment, as rapid changes create loss of landmarks as touchstones for our history and continuity, while technology is a promise for a better world.   Waterkotte uses print and graphic production to intersect the archetypal using backlighting to double the layering, seeking to detect messages or visions that come from mysticism, beliefs and familiar but individual occult.

Curated by Karen Kunc, Cather Professor of Art, UNL.

This exhibition coincides with the Mid America College Art Association Conference hosted by the UNL School of Art, Art History & Design, October 4-6, 2018.     The conference theme is “Techne Expanding: New Tensions, Tools, Terrain”.

Listening,Receive 1KuncCaritas

Randy Garber (left)  Shelley Gipson (right)

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Erik Waterkotte (left)     Stacy Asher (right)

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Nicole Pietrontoni (left)   Miguel Rivera (right)


Project Volumina: New Prints by Karen Kunc

August 25 – September 22, 2018

Constellation Studios

Reception: Tuesday August 28, 7 – 8pm

 

Project Volumina presents a print installation of compelling new work by artist Karen Kunc, created while on Faculty Development Leave in spring 2018. She was inspired by viewing collections and treasures from museums and libraries to create a new “image bank” of resources. Specifically, she studied rare books, manuscripts and incunabula (early printed books before 1501 in Europe) from the Dibner Library of the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress while in Washington DC. References are drawn between historical processes and technologies, scientific illustration, printed conventions of spatial illusions, systems of charting, mapping, mathematics, alchemy and astronomy.   She discovered these ideas from topic selection, chance encounters, page turning, following threads of connections and visual stimulus. Her new prints are created in a mixed media approach from woodblocks, etching plates, hand coloring, pochoir stencils, while trusting the unpredictable for experiential responses. Volumina revisits a theme Kunc has addressed in the past, and here again, her printed pages suggest quantities and quantities…..of printed knowledge or lore, history forgotten yet preserved, and inevitable change through time.


Project Volumina: New Prints by Karen Kunc

August 25 – September 22, 2018

Constellation Studios

Reception: Tuesday August 28, 7 – 8pm

Distillation_diptychFulletching

Project Volumina presents a print installation of compelling new work by artist Karen Kunc, created while on Faculty Development Leave in spring 2018. She was inspired by viewing collections and treasures from museums and libraries to create a new “image bank” of resources. Specifically, she studied rare books, manuscripts and incunabula (early printed books before 1501 in Europe) from the Dibner Library of the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress while in Washington DC. References are drawn between historical processes and technologies, scientific illustration, printed conventions of spatial illusions, systems of charting, mapping, mathematics, alchemy and astronomy.   She discovered these ideas from topic selection, chance encounters, page turning, following threads of connections and visual stimulus. Her new prints are created in a mixed media approach from woodblocks, etching plates, hand coloring, pochoir stencils, while trusting the unpredictable for experiential responses. Volumina revisits a theme Kunc has addressed in the past, and here again, her printed pages suggest quantities and quantities…..of printed knowledge or lore, history forgotten yet preserved, and inevitable change through time.


Pattern Play: Woodcut Print Invitational

June 1 – July 31, 2018

First Friday Reception, June 1, 6 – 8pm

Artists play with printmaking solutions that feature graphic patterning, complex play of image making, effects of optical or layered color mixing, all created through carving and printing of woodblocks. There is raw yet elegant mastery in their works and references to nature, science and social commentary.

Inspiring are new prints from Anne Burton (Lincoln), Betsy Best (Seattle) and Jean Gumpper (Colorado Springs), and significant suites of prints from the past by Keiko Hara (Walla Walla) and Brian Curling (Radebeul, Germany), brought to view from the flat files in the Constellation Studios collection.